sql server transactions

Audit and Rollback Transactions Live with dbForge Transaction Log for SQL Server

Today we’d love to unveil a big update of dbForge Transaction Log for SQL Server. This tool was designed to provide detailed information on all changes in your SQL Server database, recover data, and easily revert unwanted transactions.

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Find invalid objects in SQL Server databases

In the course of time, we can experience situations when some certain database objects have not been distributed on one or several databases or database instances. This can happen for a number of reasons. An example of that would be a case when a stored procedure refers to a nonexistent table. In this article, we are going to take a closer look at the issue of how to find invalid objects in SQL Server databases with the help of dbForge SQL Complete.

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Export SQL Stored Procedure to a File and Generate its Script

In previous articles, we have reviewed a general algorithm of finding and deleting incomplete open transactions in SQL Server databases, created a table for fixing incomplete transactions and a CRUD-stored procedure, and implemented numerous settings that will make our document workflow productive and handy.

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Find and delete incomplete open transactions in SQL Server – Part 3

In two previous articles, we have reviewed a solution for deleting incomplete open transactions in SQL Server. 

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Find and delete incomplete open transactions in SQL Server – Part 2

In the first part of the series of our articles on this subject, we presented the general algorithm for deleting open transactions that are not completed from a SQL Server database and considered the process of creating a table to record incomplete transactions. Now, let’s look at the process of creating a CRUD stored procedure to find and delete active transactions in SQL Server.

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Find and delete incomplete open transactions in SQL Server – Part 1

Frequently enough, MS SQL Server open transactions are incompleted and their initiators forget about them. This is quite a commonly encountered situation in routine database development. The most striking example is when one uses SQL Server Management Studio to run a script that starts an explicit transaction with the BEGIN TRANSACTION statement, but then the batch is canceled in the middle of a transaction without issuing a COMMIT or ROLLBACK statement to complete the transaction and the transaction is left open.

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