Capturing SQL Server Trace Data

Posted by on March 16th, 2015

One of the best ways to gather information about SQL Server workloads is to capture trace information. In this article, we will look at how to use SQL Trace and Server Events Profiler for tracing SQL Server activity. You can use this information for SQL Server auditing, monitoring and troubleshooting SQL Server performance. This article is intended for DBAs who need to collect information about workloads running on SQL Server for analytic purposes. Read the rest of this entry »

Connecting to SQL Server from Android and iOS in Direct Mode Using SDAC

Posted by on February 12th, 2015

Using SDAC in Direct Mode for access to SQL Server from iOS and Android platforms doesn’t significantly differ from the one on Mac OS X or Windows platforms. Let’s see how this works in a sample below for RAD Studio XE7. Read the rest of this entry »

Adding Timestamp to a Filename

Posted by on January 23rd, 2015

Summary: This article describes how to add time and date to a filename using the command line.

Sometimes it is crucial to append time and date to the name of a file. For example, we would like to have separate log files for each execution of data synchronization script. To prevent file overriding, we want to specify date and time in the name of each log file.

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Devart Sponsored SQLSaturday #363 – Nashville 2014

Posted by on January 21st, 2015

Devart was excited to participate at the 363d edition of SQLSaturday as a sponsor. The event took place on January 17, 2015 at the Lipscomb University, Nashville, USA. SQLSaturday’s are free 1-day training events for SQL Server professionals that focus on local speakers, providing a variety of high-quality technical sessions, and making it all happen through the efforts of volunteers. Read the rest of this entry »

Analyzing SQL Server Events with help of Events Profiler

Posted by on January 12th, 2015

dbForge Studio for SQL Server provides the SQL Events Profiler tool that captures SQL Server events from a server. The events are stored in a trace file. The trace file can later be analyzed or used to replay a specific series of steps when trying to diagnose a problem. Events Profiler shows how SQL Server executes queries internally. This allows you to see exactly what T-SQL statements are submitted to the server and how the server accesses the database to return result sets.
You can use this tool for:

  • Stepping through problem queries to find the root of the problem.
  • Finding and diagnosing slow-running queries.
  • Capturing the series of T-SQL statements that lead to a problem.
  • Monitoring the performance of SQL Server to tune workloads.
  • Correlating performance counters to diagnose problems.

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Connecting to SQL Server from Mac OS X in Direct Mode Using SDAC

Posted by on December 26th, 2014

Devart Company released SDAC and UniDAC for RAD Studio with a new functionality – Direct Mode for connection to SQL Server. The existing providers for SQL Server by Microsoft use the OLE DB interface, that allows using client applications only on Windows platforms. Due to absence of native solutions by Microsoft for Mac OS X, SDAC Direct Mode was the only opportunity to support SQL Server for Mac OS X.

Devart provides a ready solution for work with SQL Server from Mac OS X – Direct Mode. Let’s consider a simple sample of using Direct Mode. Read the rest of this entry »

Evaluating Developer’s Performance in Code Review Process

Posted by on December 22nd, 2014

Summary: This article describes how to estimate the coverage with code review of code written by individual developers.

The article builds upon Estimating Coverage of Project’s Source Code with Code Review. As from version 2.6, Review Assistant, Devart’s code review tool, provides the new Code Coverage report. Developed in response to numerous requests from our customers, the report serves for a better quality control over the code review process. Within the context of this article, we would like to show how to:

Using HTTP Tunneling

Posted by on December 22nd, 2014

Summary

This article elaborates on the HTTP Tunneling connection method and explains how to configure it by means of dbForge Studio for MySQL.

Introducing HTTP Tunneling

HTTP tunneling is a method of connecting to a MySQL Server through HTTP/HTTPS protocol and via the port that is used by a web server. The method may come  in useful when a direct connection to MySQL Server, that utilizes port 3306, is problematic for certain reasons, e.g. it is closed by security reasons, or firewall blocks access from all network protocols, except HTTP. Since port 80, that is used by web server, cannot be blocked, HTTP tunneling seems to be the ultimate technique to solve a range of MySQL connection issues.

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Adventures of CLR Types in .Net Framework

Posted by on November 28th, 2014

Summary: This article describes the issue occurred with execution of the a polygon instance of the geography type and the possible solution for it.

Once I stumbled upon the following query:


DECLARE @g1 GEOGRAPHY;
SET @g1 = geography::Parse(‘POLYGON ((0 0, 1 0, -1 1, 2 2, 0 0))’);
SELECT @g1
go

The query seemed to be quite valid and SSMS executed it smoothly, but nevertheless dbForge Studio for SQL Server failed  to execute it.

In SQL server Management Studio 2014, the query after execution returns the following binary serialized instance of the Geography data type:


0xE6100000020005000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
F03F000000000000F03F000000000000F0BF0000000000000040000000000000004000000000000000
00000000000000000001000000010000000001000000FFFFFFFF0000000003

During deserialization of the aforesaid value, dbForge Studio threw an exception, and I was destined to get to the bottom of the issue. Making no question of the value validity, I decided to write a test .NET application to localize the problem.

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Estimating Coverage of Project’s Source Code with Code Review

Posted by on November 27th, 2014

Summary: This article describes how to estimate the project’s source code coverage with code review. The article also gives an outline of how to make the most from Review Assistant’s Code Coverage report.

As from version 2.6, Review Assistant, Devart’s code review tool, provides the new Code Coverage report. Developed in response to numerous requests from our customers, the report serves for a better quality control over the code review process. Within the context of this article, we would like to show how to effectively use the tool. In particular, we will elaborate on how to:

  • Exclude excessive data from a report with filtering
  • Group report data
  • Interpret report results

Read the rest of this entry »


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